Preaching

Leadership Courage (part forty nine)

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The Unreasonableness of Being Reasonable (part four)

 

Pastor, who you are is more important than anything you say.

 

In fact, who you are is more important than everything you say!

This Leadership Courage Series is a call to embrace the courageous, risky life that leaders lived in the Church of the New Testament. It stands in glaring contrast to the lifestyle of the professional clergy that, more often than not, resembles tenured professors at our nation’s universities…without the taxpayer-funded salary package.

 

This is primarily troubling because you are not primarily an educator… you are a role model.

 

Just like Timothy, Paul, Priscilla & Aquila, Barnabas, John, and Stephen.

 

Yes, just like them.

 

If not you, then who?

 

Who else is to model the vibrant, sold-out Christian life than you, your elders, and leaders?

 

Those who write books, like those who traverse the Christian speaking circuit, don’t provide the regular proximity and access that you, as shepherd of a local congregation, do—unless you hide in your study and only emerge when it’s time to preach or lead a meeting.

 

Think about those words: proximity and access.

 

If the lyrics and music of your preaching and your life don’t align, those words will strike fear in you.

 

If, however, you’ve raised your way-of-living to match your preaching or aligned your preaching to the faith you actually live, those words will resonate with your heart right now.

 

See, when your life is “Chamberlainian” [see the last blog], the dissonance between it and the biblical message undercuts your effectiveness as a leader of God’s women and men.

 

And, when your living is “Churchillian”, the bravery to which you call your congregation is the same as the courage you routinely summon to bring God’s reign to the chaos and disorder that has besieged your community.

One of my favorite preachers is Mike Erre. Mike’s always been an amazing Bible expositor and communicator. Biblically-sound. Funny. Profound. Engaging. Illuminating. Winsome.

 

In recent years, a medical crisis has befallen someone very dear to Mike and Justina. A crisis from which there’s no recovery. None.

 

Mike’s preaching gained gravitas. Like Jesus had, when the scholars marveled at his understanding [Luke 2:47] and demons quaked in his presence [Mark 5:7]. You can sense it when you’re around Mike. This man knows what it is to follow Jesus no matter what.

 

When you live in harmony with the Biblical message, you have gravitas.

 

Weight.

 

Substance.

 

Authenticity.

 

So does your preaching.

 

When you don’t, your sermons are hollow. And that hollowness drives folks away.

 

The first to go are the true believers. The uncompromising. The bold. The spirited. The gutsy. Those who read their Bibles and believe that it says what it says. That it means what it means.

 

The people who long for authenticity. Not theory.

 

They want to associate with a faith community that will live this stuff – Jesus’ stuff – like it’s real.

 

Because it is.

Leadership Courage (part thirty):

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Leadership in a Culture of Cowardice (part sixteen)

You and I are indebted to Edwin Friedman’s remarkably insightful examination of leadership in Failure of Nerve, for this fifth leadership essential: You can’t push on a rope: the unmotivated are invulnerable to insight.

Think about Jesus’ parable of the farmer. [Mark 4:3-20] The key to fruitfulness was the soil …not the seed. Yet, we in pastoral ministry devote hundreds of our very valuable hours fussing over the seed—while ignoring the soil.

Does that make sense to you?

30 rockyLook at it again: “Some people are like seed along the path, where the word is sown. As soon as they hear it, Satan comes and takes away the word that was sown in them. Others, like seed sown on rocky places, hear the word and at once receive it with joy. But since they have no root, they last only a short time. When trouble or persecution comes because of the word, they quickly fall away. Still others, like seed sown among thorns, hear the word; but the worries of this life, the deceitfulness of wealth and the desires for other things come in and choke the word, making it unfruitful. Others, like seed sown on good soil, hear the word, accept it, and produce a crop—some thirty, some sixty, some a hundred times what was sown.” [Mark 4:15-20]

Jesus’ directs our attention to the condition of the soil. “Some people are…” he begins. The unmotivated are invulnerable to insight.

30 seedSo, why have we devoted ourselves to sifting, sorting, cleaning, massaging, and polishing the seed?

In post-Enlightenment Christendom fussing over the “seed” makes up the largest portion of an Evangelical pastor’s work week.

Why have we given so little attention to tilling the soil of our hearer’s hearts?

Could it be that we’ve forgotten what business we’re in?

Maybe we’ve inadvertently supplanted the “make-mature-disciples-who-live-like-Jesus-business” with the “faithfully-proclaim-the-Word-of-God-business”.

Think about it.

We’re commissioned to faithfully proclaim God’s Word so that people around us live like Jesus.

Aren’t we?

To distill the ministry of the Gospel down to faithful proclamation without equal regard to the life-change taking place in those we lead is akin to straining gnats and swallowing camels.

If the unmotivated are invulnerable to insight and if the key to fruitfulness is the condition of the soil, would it be wise to get really good at soil preparation?

What if you cut your sermon prep time in half?

What if you dedicated all that time to working on the receptivity of your people’s hearts?

What if you started with those who are most receptive?

What if you focused your people-development energies on the most fertile hearts instead of those with the most rocky, barren soil?

What if you did what Jesus modeled and taught?

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