The Unreasonableness of Being Reasonable (part three)

In this series, we’re examining a distinct type of leadership that is essential when anxiety is afoot—as is certainly the case in the Church in North America. You may attend a strong, confident church: one that is largely free from disquiet and emotional volatility.

Good for you.

But the Church as a whole is a dreadful mess. Hemorrhaging people and funds, closing buildings and selling off property, many once-dominant denominations in the US are failing. Even more troubling, her leaders, destabilized and evacuated of courage, are fearfully and fretfully overseeing the demise.

It’s in this context that clear, decisive, non-anxious leadership is non-negotiable.

We’re looking at nine characteristics of such leadership. Each one modeled for us by Jesus. Currently we’re looking at the seventh: Disengage an unreasonable faith in reasonableness.

Realize that there was nothing “reasonable” in Jesus’ call to be his disciple. His standards were unmistakable. Like this one: No one can serve two masters. Either you will hate the one and love the other… [Lk 16:13]

As a leader, who you are is more important than anything you say.

In fact, who you are is more important than everything you say.

 

Ministers, often times, are master pulpiteers.

 

Skilled rhetoricians.

 

Gifted orators.

 

Big talkers.

 

But talk that’s not backed by a life has a hollow ring. And that hollowness drives people away… away from church… away from the Church.

When Winston Churchill addressed the Harrow School in late October 1941 his speech included these most famous words:

“Never give in. Never give in. Never, never, never, never–in nothing, great or small, large or petty–never give in, except to convictions of honor and good sense. Never yield to force. Never yield to the apparently overwhelming might of the enemy.”

His words, then as now, ring true.

Why?

 

Because Churchill didn’t give in.  

 

Neville Chamberlain, who famously capitulated to the Nazis could not have made that speech.

And if he had, it would never have been remembered.

The words didn’t match his life.

Do yours?