In my coaching practice it’s common to address situations where a leader’s decision impacts people in less than desirable ways. We know the higher up you are in an organization, the more challenging the problems that land in your lap.

Senior Pastors of large congregations spend much of their time dealing with very complex situations. And, when they do, no matter how many or how clear headed your advisors are, it will fall to you to make the most difficult decisions. And, the nature of leadership is that several will be upset with almost any decision you make. 

Interesting that the Greek word “crisis” means “to decide”.

When leaders decide, they and others are impacted, and the impact—as we’ve said—is not always positive. This is why it is so detrimental to pastor your congregation as an appeaser, a consensus-builder, a “lets all go happily together” guy.  The only way to please the majority is to avoid the “crisis” that every decision brings. And that, of course, is not to decide at all.

60 EFCIf you’ve been following the European financial crisis these last few years, you’ll have watched politicians NOT decide.

In the absence of clear, courageous leaders making painful but principled decisions, debtor nations keep amassing ever more enormous deficits and the ECB creates worth-less Euros in a vain attempt to forestall the collapse of that teetering house of cards.

In 2009 a CNBC study revealed that of the world’s top twenty debtor nations seventeen are European.

60 delayed decision

To avoid the “crisis” of making important, necessary, and difficult decisions now, we can create an impact in the future many times worse.

 

How much of the current disconnect between the Church and the society she was given by God to rescue and resuscitate is the result of pastors who, for decades, were unwilling to upset parishioners committed to the minister-to-me status quo? As congregations removed themselves from helping in the communities where God placed them as salt and light, those communities have continued to struggle in the dark.

Whatever our intentions, we get to address the impact of our decisions—including those decisions not to decide.

60 standoffIf immersing yourself in work—because the mortgage crisis reduced your family’s only asset to a liability—has produced isolation and distance in your marriage, there’s no point defending yourself. Own your impact and give yourself to your spouse with the abandon you once promised.

Remember?

If you’re “sideways” with one of your siblings over different views of how to care for aging parents, it does no good to keep asserting the “rightness” of your position. Just get off it and reach for your sibling in love.

Today, begin having the impact you’ve always wanted.

Tick Tock!

 

 

Coaching distinctions #60.doc